Electrodeless Induction Lamps

Updated
13-VII-2013
Ever since the great scientist Nikola Tesla stunned his audiences with fabulous demonstrations of induction lighting more than a century ago, lighting firms worldwide have tried to master the technology in an efficient and commercially viable format. There was some activity on the subject in the USA in the late 1970s, but intgrated electronic ballasts and the subject of radio frequency emissions prevented a commercial launch.

In the 1980s the subject of a low-wattage incandescent retrofit lamp was being extensively researched in the labs of Philips and Thorn Lighting, both of whom created advanced prototypes that came very close to a market launch. But the high price of the technology remained a barrier to production. Sylvania in USA meanwhile experimented with large high efficiency tubular sources that offered greater potential for energy savings.

It was not until the early 1990s that Panasonic, then Philips, GE-Thorn and Osram-Sylvania all placed practical lamps on the market. More recent years have seen impressive Chinese dabblings in the art, especially from the firms Tungda and Hongyuan, whose lamps are illustrated below.

Remote Ballasted Lamps

Philips

85W

QL Electrodeless Half Coated Demonstration
1992

Philips

85W

QL Electrodeless Induction System
2001

Osram

100W

Endura Inductively Coupled Electrodeless
2002

Tungda

85W

TL85 - First Chinese electrodeless lamp
2001

TUE

1000W

Electrodeless Sulphur Microwave lamp
1999

Stella

3000W

Electrodeless Xenon Water-Cooled FB-3000
1983

Self Ballasted Lamps

Philips

20W

XL 20W Advanced Prototype Retrofit Lamp
1985

GE-Thorn

23W

Advanced prototype self-ballasted electrodeless
1991

GE Lighting

23W

Genura Self-ballasted electrodeless reflector
1994

National

12W

Matsushita Electrodeless Pa-Look Ball YOU
2003

Hongyuan

60W

Saturn 2 Self-ballasted Chinese electrodeless
2003